Veterinarians

In recent years, zoonoses and communicable diseases common to man and animals have gained increasing attention worldwide. Human diseases that have their origins in infected animals, such as AIDS and A/H1N1. The ease and speed of modern travel facilitates the spread of diseases once confined to specific geographic areas (SARS). Animal migration and trade pose a similar threat, as was shown by outbreaks in the United States of West Nile fever, and most recently, monkeypox—two diseases not previously known in the Western Hemisphere. Each of these examples highlights the need for accurate, up-to-date information which public health professionals need as they plan country and region specific strategies to combat potential outbreaks as also manage existing ones.

This section has links to essential information around how zoonoses spread and prevention and control strategies can be strengthened in developing countries like India; priority zoonoses include interesting FAQs, key areas of concern and links to videos and other web resources. It also lists some of the RCZI special initiatives including Zoonoses Watch, a quarterly newsletter and the RCZI Blog

- What are Zoonoses?
- Why are Zoonoses important?
- What are the key issues in Zoonoses prevention and control?
- What makes India more vulnerable?
- Where do Zoonoses come from?
- How do Zoonoses spread?
- What can I do to prevent Zoonoses?

Priority Zoonoses provides information on seven zoonotic diseases (Leptospirosis, Rabies, Japanese Encephalitis, Anthrax, Brucellosis, Bovine Tuberculosis, Cysticercosis, Rickettsial Infections and Salmonellosis) which have been identified by a national expert group as focus diseases for the next five years. Each of these priority zoonoses have been taken up separately with information classified under: Global Situation, Regional/India Situation, Public health measures, Animal health and Recent publications. Links to fast facts and some interesting videos have also been provided.

     

Leptospirosis
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures 

Rabies
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

Japanese Encephalitis
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

     

Anthrax
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

Brucellosis
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

Bovine Tuberculosis
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

     

Cysticercosis
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

Rickettsial Infections
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

Salmonellosis
- Global Situation
- Regional/India Situation
- Public Health Measures

  • Health Map collates disparate data sources to achieve a unified and comprehensive view of the current global state of infectious diseases and their effect on human and animal health. A free website, it integrates outbreak data of varying reliability, ranging from news sources (Google News) to curated personal accounts (ProMED) to validated official alerts (WHO). Through an automated text processing system, data is aggregated by disease and displayed by location for user-friendly access to the original alert. It provides a jumping-off point for real-time information on emerging infectious diseases and is of particular interest to public health professionals and those embarking on international travel

  • What’s New gives a quick snapshot of the latest global initiatives, events and developments in the world of zoonoses 

  • Resources on Zoonoses is a repository of links that provide information to some pathbreaking work being done by the world’s leading research and development organisations as also access to the latest web resources on zoonoses 

  • RCZI Newsletter Zoonoses Watch is a quarterly e-newsletter brought out by the Public Health Foundation of India on the Roadmap to Zoonoses in India (RCZI) initiative, taking up a specialised theme in each of its issues, covering topics of interests to policy makers, public health practitioners, animal health experts and those engaged in advocacy and communication.  

  • RCZI Blog has interesting posts and comments by experts and guest bloggers on the complex but interesting aspects of human-animal health interface